Sunday, May 06, 2012

Little Gems

If you are not spending time bird-watching which involves craning your neck into the canopy branches of trees or peaking through dense shrubbery and you keep your eyes on your feet so that you do not trip over a tree root or step in a nice deep  mire of mud, then you might see some of these tiny and wonderful woodland wildflowers.  A few I know and the rest you are on your own.  I have gone through a few references in my library and because I only took photos of the blossoms I cannot identify accurately.  But you do not want to be bored with history or species ID.

Jack in the Pulpit...in abundance this year!

Blue-eyed grass...so tiny and so lovely.

I think a wild clover?

Wild Geranium

????
If you live near a woodland park, take time to explore your toes as you walk.

16 comments:

Brian Miller said...

smiles..i enjoy exploring my toes and all they tend to stop on....esp in the summer where bare feet are a must...

One Woman's Journey - a journal being written from Woodhaven - her cottage in the woods. said...

I love walking in the woods and seeing the different plants.
Most I do not know what they are...

D. Jean Quarles said...

I love those last dainty beauties.

Robert Sobczak said...

I'm always amazed at how well I can see the tiny details when I review my photos afterwards. That especially applies with the macro lens setting. Seems like the smaller you go the greater the diversity grows, too.

Uttara said...

This is great!! hey i lov ur photography..can u tell me which camera you use?

Tabor said...

Uttara, I used a Canon Powershot G9 for a quick carry and a Canon EOS Rebel XT DSLR with several lenses for my serious walking ;-).

Annie in Austin said...

Lovely photos, Tabor! Soil & climate are so different here so no Jack in the Pulpit for me. Your last plant may be Waterleaf, Hydrophyllum virginianum. It's been many years since I grew it with red trillium and Solomon's seal... you are making me nostalgic!

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

Tabor said...

Yay!! Annie in Austin got it right, I have been searching and searching without luck.

Liz @ A Nut in a Nutshell said...

I so wish I could identify what I see out there! Truth be told, I might not even recognize poison ivy. Eeks!

chris said...

beautiful photos! I found a jack-in-the-pulpit just yesterday - so inconspicuous from above, so interesting from below looking in!

Uttara said...

That's great..I have got a basic canon EOS 1100D .. I do not no much about lenses ..but I am trying to learn slowly...:) Do check this out at your leisure --> https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.165261423601861.32893.100003540141736&type=3

Dave said...

Small plants can have nice flowers, even weeds! I think that pink flower you thought was clover, Tabor, is what we call oxalis. It is an invasive weed. It develops tiny bulbs on the main bulb and these fall off and propogate. When weeding them out take the surrounding soil - about a hand full - and throw it all away as it will have the tiny bulbs mixed. - Dave

Dave King said...

We do have a lot of blue-eyed grass. I shall peep between my toes in future! Thanks.

Shrinky said...

I sincerely doubt I could ever photograph any of our fauna this well - you truly have such a remarkable talent. Ahhhh, beautiful.

Petra said...

We have many similar flowers in our garden and I always regret that grass must be mown and the flowers destroyed. They are so tiny and yet beautiful.

Annmarie Pipa said...

we have all of these in our woods too..the boys pick the wild flowers for me and put them on the table..they seem to notice the beauty in nature a lot more than adults sometimes!!
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