Wednesday, July 08, 2015

Wineberries

While our garden raspberries and blackberries are done in their production and while we have harvested enough to produce a dozen pints of freezer jam as well as plenty to eat...the wild wineberries are now producing in abundance. 


These are named Rubus phoenicolasius, meaning “raspberry with purple hairs.”  Native to eastern Asia, the plant was introduced into eastern America in the late 1800s as breeding stock for new raspberry varieties. It is still used today in the detection of viruses harmful to other raspberry plants.  It is really an invasive in my area as it covers large areas at the edge of our woods crowding out other native plants. The berries, while smaller than the hybrids, are very sweet and juicy this year, due to our 13 inches of rain this month!   Both birds and deer are enjoying the abundance and while I am out walking and taking pictures I also grab a handful or two for refreshment.

They do freeze well, and if my freezer were not full of the other raspberries, I might harvest more.

6 comments:

ellen abbott said...

the only wild berries we have are dewberries, a native blackberry.

Celia said...

What a find though, raspberries that freeze well. Eat some for me. I have never seen these around Eastern Washington.

Bob Bushell said...

Raspberries, yum yum. It won't be long that autumn berry.

Red said...

Oh those invasives! Invasives worry me . with globalization there will be more invasives show up.

messymimi said...

We have blackberry vines, and as for invasives, don't get me started. Those look delicious, no matter what variety they are.

Midlife Roadtripper said...

I recall one of the finest tastes in this world after reading your post -- choosing the perfect raspberry on the cane and dropping it into my mouth. Sheer delight.