Friday, June 10, 2016

The Traveler

A cool front came through quietly in the night after the rain.  Like a stealth bomber it surrounded everything with the driest coolest air. With coffee in hand, I smiled during my early morning walk across the front yard as an alter reality reminded me not of spring but of fall.  I swear, I almost heard crickets!  All of my roses and other flowers were smiling and sighing as well.  They were at peace because the warmer more humid air had retreated as we marched headlong into summer.


By noon, new strong winds pulled and tugged at the tree leaves and made the 50 foot high tree limbs dance in drunken pleasure and must have frightened any nested birds that had not yet flown.  The wind roared against the side of the house and kept the air cooler although the sun did his best to make it warmer.  In the shade it was May and in the sun it was June.  Strong gusts pushed leaves and small dead branches across my driveway in a race for first place.  It made the Coreopsis bob its new yellow blossoms as if they were part of a rap group.

I sat under the tiny arbor reading and smelled the air and then began thinking about where this rushing air had begun its journey.  Was it born in the slide of some crystal mountain glacier?  Did it begin in a high dessert that was still in spring?  The air was fresh with oxygen as if from some mountain top.  It raced past my face and pushed up my hair.  I wondered if it had come from an Alaska ocean and had touched the backs of salmon and the feathers of high eagles before it rushed across the continent to my tiny woods.  Had it surfed across some snow drift in a shaded valley far, far from here?

What secret messages had it brought that I missed with my limited language skills?  Was it miffed that my e-reader had no pages to flip capriciously.  What inspiration brought this joy ride?

Yes, it was in a hurry and will only race across here for a few days.  Soon we will be back to quiet summer with its angrier storms and heavier air.

Tuesday, June 07, 2016

Surprise in the Country

We have been so busy that taking a drive after dinner was an essential break from our routine. It was hubby's good idea as I had laundry I was concentrating on.  We live very close to some beautiful farmland, so come along and see what we found! 

Can you smell the freshly plowed earth and hear the cry of the hawk over the field


Can you feel the cool breeze coming off the river now that the sun is getting lower in the sky?   And look!  The farmer and his wife are taking their little ones for a walk.

What a nice respite at the end of a hard-working day for us all.  Even the farmer's horses want to get in on the action.

Saturday, June 04, 2016

Now, That Was Embarassing

I always hate those awkward moments, like yesterday, when we embarrassed someone changing their clothes. 


He/she made a mad dash for shady cover the minute we reached down behind them for the skin which they had left...almost, and which felt very oddly alive still! 

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Watered-down

While we have had days of sun, we have had many days of rain. Thus, I have decided to post some digitally watered-down photos. 

Friday, May 27, 2016

Bachelor

Centaurea cyanus is also known as cornflower, basketflower, bluebottle, hurtsickcle and more commonly, perhaps, a bachelor button.   It is hard to understand how this was considered a weed that filled the fields and thus got the name cornflower, like a grain.  Then with agriculture growth and herbicides used to control weeds, it became endangered.   It can be found in only 3 sites in England where it used to be in over 250 areas.  Yet again, since it "sneaks" into grain seeds that are sent around the world, it is also known as an invasive weed or naturalized flower in other areas around the world!


In the United States they are popular in "grandma's garden."  The name bachelor button came about as bachelors wore them in their lapels when they were sweet on someone they wanted to date.  The longer the flower lasted, the stronger that the love was true love.  If the flower died fairly soon, than the bachelor had to find another true love.

The flowers are edible and look nice in salads.  They are also used in Lady Gray teas.  When picked, it should be in the early morning while still in bud and they will last longer in the flower arrangements.

My plant came out of a package of "wildflower" seeds that I scattered in a small bed.  I have only two little plants, but I do love that true blue color.  

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Welcome to the Jungle

These are the weird and wild days. "Global warming?" the skeptics decry, "WTF?" This spring has been extensive in days that are very cool---temperature wise.  I am not complaining.  I understand that this is an example of global warming, folks.  Usually our springs last a week or two and then we are into hot and humid summer where birds and frogs can barely breath the thick air, much less sing or croak.  


The forest has become a jungle with trees growing inches each day and letting their heavy branches drape like green shawls almost to the ground.  Even the volunteer jack-in-the-pulpit which grows beneath the blackberry bushes has out grown them by inches already!  And it has "pupped."

 
This year I could be standing on some planescape in a more Northern clime watching gauzy mist and ethereal clouds rolling in across gray green planes of wet vegetation.  I feel like that wanderlust lass in a romance novel waiting for her lover's ship to come in.   Then as the fog or mist lifts, ever so rarely, there are jewels of flowers with over-washed faces and limp hair-dos wondering what happened to the sun. 





It seems unfair that such rain makes everything so rich in growth and yet so beaten down with water.   I am not complaining, because I do not look forward to hot and humid.  But being of the Mediterranean gene pool, I do like to see the sun once in a while!

 

 

Friday, May 20, 2016

Almost Missed These

Yes, it is a gorgeous and long spring this year. Thought I would share some newcomers to the world. Below are Wood Ducks in a nearby marsh.