Saturday, November 14, 2009

We (I) Beat the Thieves!

This scrawny little Asian persimmon tree was planted last year as the anchor for an ornamental bed that would help to hide the ugly electric box beside the driveway. This bed has been slow to develop as we were waiting for the deer fence to be installed to protect anything that was planted, but the tree standing by itself has thrived.

It is about 8 feet tall and it produced about 8 fruit this year. These persimmon are oval and unlike the traditional Asian round persimmon that can be purchased in the grocery stores during the winter holidays. We watched with care the ripening of each orb. While we have wild persimmon in this area, this exotic variety produces larger and more flavorful fruit and has no seeds. Besides, Tabor is not willing to climb that high like the racoons do for such reward.



If picked too soon persimmon are very mouth puckering as they taste of alum from the high tannins. But if you wait until the exact day of ripeness they are perfect envelopes of sweet juicy fruit. Of course, you have to beat the four legged thieves by picking them exactly one day early and letting them further ripen on the kitchen counter. Needless to say, they do not all ripen on exactly the same day, so guess who spends their time molesting fruit waiting for it to feel like a water balloon? I did just read that I can pick them earlier and let them ripen on the counter or put them in the freezer for 24 hours. With only 8 I hesitate to experiment. But with hubby gone during the time I harvested them I did get to eat them all myself.

11 comments:

Kikit said...

My place here is well known for persimmons. Since many people share some to me, I feel lucky I don't have to beat the thieves.

And yes, the persimmons here are round. :)

Barry said...

I know only too well what you mean. We grew corn one year and the very day we decided to pick it, the raccoons arrived in the night and ate every one.

Betsy from Tennessee said...

We too have an 'ugly' in our yard---that we have to HIDE.... Ours is a telephone pole --and anchor... GADS! BUT--our Clematis goes right up that anchor and hides at least that part. The pole itself???? WELL---it's still visible... ha ha

Your persimmon tree really is doing well...
Hugs,
Betsy

Kerry said...

Somewhere I saw a Persimmon Chutney recipe and thought it sounded great. And me without any persimmons in sight:>(

Robert V. Sobczak said...

Interesting plant: sounds like you have an experiment on your hands that will eventually bear fruit. If you can can them in jam jars you'll be gold!

Dave King said...

My dad was a golf club-maker, and persimmon to me has always meant club heads!

Stephen Tremp said...

I've never eaten a persimmon before. I'm going to Henry's Market today and look for them. Always like trying something new. Thanks.

Stephen Tremp

Bagman and Butler said...

If you leave the high ones for the racoons, it seems to me they would leave you the low ones. Don't they play fair? But they sure sound delicious.

Annie in Austin said...

I've got two of the round orange store kind waiting for me right now, but would be willing to molest & ingest a couple of those golden persimmons for you, Tabor.

A few people around here grow them but have had squirrels chew off the entire end of the branch to get the fruit.

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

Good grief the verications are getting odd... mine is "drumalko"

Kerri said...

My mouth is watering. It's a very long time since I've tasted a delicious persimmon. Somewhere back in my Australia days.
Your little tree is doing well.

mss @ Zanthan Gardens said...

I can never get enough persimmons. When I lived in Japan it was great because everyone (whose parents still lived on the farm) would bring bags full of them to work.

The first tree I planted here was a 'Eureka' persimmon (because they are self-fertile). Mine sets tons of fruit each year but drops them when they are marble sized. Then the squirrels attack. So, I'm frustrated.

Yes, persimmons come in two shapes. Also some varieties do not have to be jelly-soft to be edible. Others are sweeter after a light frost.